Show

Name
Station
YYYY-MM-DD
  • 1970-11-21
Comments
  • Many thanks to Ken Garner for tracklisting information on this show.
  • Sound quality of the recording is fairly clear, but with some fading and distortion, noticeable in the first part of the show
  • After reminding listeners of his Miss Top Gear contest, Peel quotes a remark by Bob Hope[1], who was hosting the Miss World contest in London on the previous evening when it was disrupted by feminist protesters who heckled him and threw flour bombs. Hope said they "must be on some kind of dope” [1] Peel may have seen the event on BBC1 TV[2]; the protests inspired the 2020 film MIsbehaviour.
  • Bridget St John's session includes a cover of John Martyn's "Back To Stay"; the Groundhogs do Tommy Johnson's "Gasoline" (originally recorded by him in 1928 as "Cool Drink of Water Blues") complete with an imitation of Johnson's vocal style.
  • As on the original broadcast of the East of Eden session, the track logged as "Scott of the Antarctic" is announced by Peel as "Snot of the Antarctic" - the actual title?
  • John has finally got a release copy of Decals, with the actual track names on it

Sessions

  • Bridget St John #3 First Broadcast. Recorded 1970-11-09. No known commercial release.
  • Terry & Gay Woods #1 First Broadcast. Recorded 1970-11-03. No known commercial release.
  • Groundhogs #1 Repeat. First Broadcast 12 September 1970. Recorded 1970-08-04. No known commercial release.
    • First play of ‘Gasoline’. ‘Mistreated’ not played.
  • East Of Eden #2 Repeat. First Broadcast 12 September 1970. Recorded 1970-08-11. No known commercial release.

(Please add details of any commercial release of these sessions)

Tracklisting

(Please add further release details, external links, etc.)


File

Name
  • 1) J P Top Gear 21 Nov 1970.mp3
  • 2) Gay & Terry Woods - Peel session - 21/11/70
Length
  • 1) 1:33:08
  • 2) 10:10 (from 5:47 unique)
Other
Length
  • 1) Many thanks to the original taper, and to Tim for purchasing from eBay and digitisation
  • 2) Many thanks to Colin Harper
Available
Length

References

  1. Bob Hope (1903-2003) was unpopular with the counter-culture of the time due to his role in organising tours to entertain US troops in Vietnam. He was best-known for his comedy films of the 1940s and 1950s, some of them co-starring Bing Crosby..
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