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Show

Name
Station
YYYY-MM-DD
  • 1968-05-26
Comments
  • Trailer by Humphrey Lyttleton for his Sunday evening programme The Jazz Scene precedes Peel's intro to this show, spoken over the Top Gear theme tune
    July

    The cover of July's self titled album

  • Peel mentions he doesn't like the sleeve of July's LP, but does like the sound. He thinks they're Irish, because most of the artists on their record label are. In fact, they're from Ealing, London.[1]
  • Peel plays a session track from Alan Bown covering Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower", which was famously covered later in 1968 by Jimi Hendrix. The Mike Stuart Span cover Tomorrow's "My White Bicycle" on their session.
  • He plays Fairport Convention's version of Joni Mitchell's "Chelsea Morning" from their first LP but says, mistakenly, that the song was written by Judy Collins.
  • Eric Burdon And The Animals' session session includes "Landscape", a song by Shawn Phillips, sung by Zoot Money. Their session also includes "When Things Go Wrong", which, as Peel remarks, "sounds suspiciously like 'It Hurts Me Too" (by Elmore James). He says he's disappointed that the version of the single "Monterey" doesn't have the Who-like guitar effect of the record. (The version on the previous session by Burdon and the Animals had a backing which was virtually identical to the record - did they use a pre-recorded tape?)
  • He has doubts about the correct way to pronounce David Bowie's surname and gives three alternatives before settling on the familiar one. He also complains about the lack of record cleaning materials in the studio.
  • He praises Eclection's performance, apparently their first in front of an audience, at the LSE the previous evening. Their first and only LP was issued by Elektra later in the year and they did sessions for Top Gear before splitting up.,
  • He reports that the Tunbridge Wells ladies' water polo team voted not to play in Peking this summer.
  • Peel mentions that the track he plays from Ars Nova's self-titled album (also on Elektra) was a Bernie Andrews favourite..
  • Peel says next week's Top Gear will be broadcast between 3 to 5pm, unlike this one which began at 2 p.m.. At 2 p.m next Sunday Jimmy Savile would introduce Savile's Travels, but Peel little suspected that John Walters, who worked on Savile's show, would later become producer of Top Gear.
  • Peel mentions that he spent a lot of time with Captain Beefheart And His Magic Band' lat week, including a gig at Frank Freeman's Dancing School. He points out that the "Moonchild" single, just issued in the UK, was recorded two years ago and the band doesn't like it, although he played it on the radio when he worked in San Bernardino.
  • Says he'll be at the Oz benefit at Middle Earth that evening and in Portsmouth the following night.
  • Peel ends the show with a track from Fever Tree, covering the Beatles' double A-side "Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out". He mentions that he's had a lot of letters about the Fever Tree LP, which was only available on import. A listener wrote to Melody Maker, asking how he could obtain a copy. In reply, Peel recommended One Stop Records, one of his preferred record shops of the time.
  • Closing remarks: "What I need is an entire Sunday to play all these things to you…..production by mad motorcyclist Bernie Andrews… In the meantime be gentle with one another, and don’t play too much cricket". - a reference to his earlier remark, when playing the Rolling Stones single, about how 'playing cricket with the system' is an ineffective approach if you want to change anything

Sessions

Tracklisting

(2:30pm news edited out)

Tracks marked @ on File 2

File

Name
  • 1) J P Top Gear 26 May 1968 complete
  • 2) Eric Burdon & the Animals - Peel session - Top Gear 26/5/68
Length
  • 1) 2:02:00
  • 2) 0:07:37
Other
  • 1) Many thanks to Tim
  • 2) Many thanks to Colin Harper
Available

References

  1. The label, Major Minor, was owned by Irish businessman Philip Solomon and its records were played heavily on Radio Caroline, because he was helping to finance the struggling pirate station. The Caroline DJs didn't always appreciate this, because many Major Minor releases were sub-standard or corny, and Johnnie Walker complained on-air about it.
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